Therapeutic Goal Achievement Independent of Cardiovascular Risk in Psoriatic Arthritis

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When patients with established psoriatic arthritis were compared with those with early disease, no differences were found in the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors.
When patients with established psoriatic arthritis were compared with those with early disease, no differences were found in the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors.
This article is part of Rheumatology Advisor's 2017 in-depth coverage of ACR, which took place in San Diego, CA. Our staff will be reporting on the latest treatment advancements and research initiatives for spondyloarthritis. Click here to read more of Rheumatology Advisor's conference coverage.

SAN DIEGO – With the exception of sedentary lifestyle, cardiovascular risk factors were not found to have an impact on the likelihood of achieving minimal disease activity among patients with psoriatic arthritis, according to research to be presented at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting, held November 3-8 in San Diego, California.

In a cross-sectional study, patients with established psoriatic arthritis (n=227; mean disease duration 9.6 years) or age-matched patients with early-onset psoriatic arthritis (<2 years duration) with no history of treatment (n=210) were enrolled. The association of cardiovascular risk factors with achievement of minimal disease activity was evaluated. Risk factors assessed included hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, and cardiovascular events.

Of the patients with established psoriatic arthritis, 133 achieved minimal disease activity (58.6%). In a univariate model, tobacco (odds ratio [OR] 0.54), sedentary lifestyle (OR 1.95), hyperuricemia (OR 2.01), and obesity (OR 1.54) were associated with achieving minimal disease activity (P <.25). Multivariate analysis revealed that only sedentary lifestyle was associated with achievement of minimal disease activity (OR 3.13; P =.002).

When patients with established psoriatic arthritis were compared with those with early disease, no differences were found in the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors.

The study authors noted that their results were “contrary to what has been found in other studies.” Nonetheless, they maintained that, “patients with psoriatic disease should be encouraged to maintain healthy lifestyle habits.”

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Reference

Queiro R, Cañete JD. Influence of cardiovascular comorbidity on achieving therapeutic goals: a comparative study between recent-onset psoriatic arthritis and established disease. Presented at: 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting; November 3-8, 2017; San Diego, CA. Abstract 2525.

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