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Pregnancy for patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and lupus has historically been associated with complications, including increased risk for preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and fetal death, but outcomes have improved in the last 2 decades. However, identifying, predicting, and preventing the risk for pregnancy complications in this population still remains challenging.


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Taking us on a deep dive into the subject is the 2020 recipient of the Rheumatology Research Foundation Shaun Ruddy Memorial Lectureship, Jane Salmon, MD, the Collette Kean research chair at the Hospital for Special Surgery and professor of medicine and obstetrics and gynecology at Weill Cornell Medicine, New York.

Read the full transcript for this episode here

Featured Guest

Jane Salmon, MD, is a Collette Kean research professor and the director of the Lupus and Antiphospholipid Center of Excellence at Hospital for Special Surgery, New York. She is a professor of medicine and associate dean of faculty affairs at Weill Cornell College of Medicine, New York.

Dr Salmon earned her medical degree from the Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and completed her training in internal medicine at the New York Hospital and in rheumatology at Hospital for Special Surgery.

Dr Salmon’s research has focused on elucidating mechanisms of tissue injury in lupus and other autoimmune diseases. Her basic, translational, and clinical studies have led to a paradigm shift in the understanding of mechanisms of pregnancy loss, cardiovascular disease, and end-organ damage in patients with lupus. Ground-breaking laboratory discoveries about causes of pregnancy loss and preeclampsia, and subsequent observational studies in women with lupus have allowed her to identify new targets to reduce damage and improve outcomes in patients with autoimmune disease.

In recognition of Dr Salmon’s contributions, she was awarded the Carol Nachman international prize in rheumatology, the Virginia Kneeland Frantz ’22 Distinguished Women in Medicine award from the Columbia P&S Alumni Association, the Evelyn V. Hess Award from the Lupus Foundation of America, Master of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and election to the American Association of Physicians and National Academy of Medicine.