Patients with hyperuricemia and gout have a significantly higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events than all practice patients receiving care in a community-based nephrology practice, according to study findings presented at the live virtual 2020 National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meetings.

In a study of patients treated at Renal Associates, LLC, in Columbus, Georgia, the prevalence of CVD events was 32.3% among patients with hyperuricemia and gout (study group) compared with 17.6% among practice patients, Raj Alappan, MD, and Uma Devi Alappan reported in a poster presentation.

Among patients with CKD stage 3, the prevalence of CVD events was about 32% in the study group compared with 13% of practice patients.


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The study included 513 patients with hyperuricemia (257 patients) or gout (256 patients) and 613 practice patients.

Noting the absence of a consensus on the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia, the authors proposed preemptive treatment of all patients with hyperuricemia, or at a minimum gout patients with uric acid levels of 10 mg/dL or higher, to mitigate potential development of gout, CVD, and hypertension.

Patients with CVD had higher uric acid levels than non-CVD patients. Among hypertensive patients, those with gout had significantly higher uric acid levels than hyperuricemic patients. Considering race and age, whites with CVD had higher uric acid levels than blacks with CVD (8.40 vs. 7.76 mg/dL), and older individuals (aged 65 years and older) had higher CVD occurrence than younger individuals (aged less than 65 years) in male but not in female patients.

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Reference

Alappan UD, Alappan R. Symptomatic hyperuricemia (gout) patients have higher occurrence of cardiovascular and coronary artery disease. Data presented at the live virtual 2020 National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meetings held March 25-28. Poster 197.

This article originally appeared on Renal and Urology News