Gout is common among patients on dialysis in the United States, with a higher prevalence among patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) compared with hemodialysis (HD), according to study findings presented at the American Society of Nephrology’s Kidney Week 2021.

In addition, patients with gout were older, more likely male, and had a higher body mass index and shorter dialysis vintage compared with patients who did not have gout. Among patients on HD, those with gout were more likely to dialyze with a fistula than a catheter compared with those without gout.

“This report provides a snapshot of gout in the US dialysis population and offers opportunities to expand on research to improve awareness and care for patients with gout and [end-stage kidney disease],” Angelo Karaboyas, PhD, of the Arbor Research Collaborative for Health in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and colleagues reported in a poster presentation.


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Dr Karaboyas and colleagues analyzed data from 70,297 patients with HD from the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) and 5117 patients from the Peritoneal Dialysis Outcomes and Practices Patterns Study (PDDOPPS). When gout was defined by a current prescription for colchicine, febuxostat, or allopurinol and prior history of gout, gout prevalence was 21% among patients on PD and 13% among patients on HD, according to the investigators. Gout prevalence was highest among patients with a dialysis vintage less than 4 months.

“The true prevalence of gout was likely higher than observed when considering the under-diagnosis of gout among advanced renal disease patients,” the authors concluded.

The investigators observed minimal association between gout and hard clinical outcomes, including all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and all-cause hospitalization. They also found no evidence of an association between gout and patient-reported outcomes, including health-related quality of life.

Reference

Karaboyas A, Zhao J, LaMoreaux B, et al. Characterization of gout in US patients treated with hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Presented at: Kidney Week 2021, November 2-7, 2021. Abstract PO0800.

This article originally appeared on Renal and Urology News