Slides - Rheumatology Advisor

Slides

Improving Medication Adherence in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Improving medication adherence is essential to improving outcomes, but this task remains a significant challenge because adherence is a complex behavior mediated by numerous variables, including socioeconomic factors, psychosocial factors, quality of patient–physician relationships, drug regimen, and disease characteristics.

A thorough patient history and physical examination can reveal important information regarding joint mobility and range of motion. For example, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have cervical spine involvement, with instability arising from atlantoaxial or subaxial subluxation. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint may limit jaw opening, and therefore may influence the choice of airway management. [1]

Preparing Your Patient With Rheumatoid Arthritis for Surgery

Rheumatologists are usually called upon to ‘clear’ their patients for surgery, yet the evidence upon which to base this decision is fractionated and inconsistent. The need for continuity of care requires that surgeon and the anesthesiologist are as knowledgeable as the rheumatologist about the relevant medical conditions that can influence surgical outcomes.

There are a variety of classes, programs and exercises to help patients diagnosed with arthritis. The following tips from the CDC can help patients self-manage their pain, minimize joint damage and improve/maintain function and quality of life.

Helping Patients Relieve Arthritis Pain

Approximately 1 in 5 American adults have been diagnosed with arthritis, according to the CDC. Arthritis includes more than 100 rheumatic conditions that affect joints, the tissues that surround the joint, and other connective tissue. Advise patients with arthritis with these tips to aid in their own recovery. Read more on the programs mentioned in…

Hallmarks of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a long-term autoimmune disorder that may affect the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and other organs. Although factors such as sunlight, certain drugs and viral infections are known to trigger SLE, the underlying cause is not fully understood. Because SLE is uncommon – it currently affects approximately 40 to 50 persons…

Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic pain, stiffness, and tenderness of muscles, tendons, and joints without detectable inflammation. It affects an estimated 3 to 6 million Americans. Fibromyalgia is the second most common disorder seen by rheumatologists. It predominantly affects women at a rate of 3.4%, and less commonly, men at 0.5%, children at 1.2% to 6.2%, and the elderly. Prevalence increases with age, and diagnosis is most common between ages 60 and 79, although symptoms are often present years prior to diagnosis. It can occur independently or can be associated with another rheumatic disease, such as systemic lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.

Fibromyalgia Pain Management

Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic pain, stiffness, and tenderness of muscles, tendons, and joints without detectable inflammation. It affects an estimated 3 to 6 million Americans. View this slideshow to learn more about diagnosis and management of this challenging condition.

A ring-like swelling towards the fingertip, common in individuals with osteoarthritis, which is formed by a lump of cartilage-covered bone around the terminal joint. Osteoarthritis most commonly affects the elderly.

Arthritis Classifications

Arthritis is the inflammation of one or more joints. The condition occurs when cartilage that normally protects the joints breaks down, causing the bones to rub together. This results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited motion. As many as 37 million Americans have arthritis with etiologies ranging from autoimmune disorders to infection to general wear…